Western Culture – Western Rollarama http://western-rollarama.com/ Mon, 21 Jun 2021 14:02:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://western-rollarama.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Western Culture – Western Rollarama http://western-rollarama.com/ 32 32 Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan slammed for blaming “very short clothes” on increase in sexual violence https://western-rollarama.com/pakistani-prime-minister-imran-khan-slammed-for-blaming-very-short-clothes-on-increase-in-sexual-violence/ https://western-rollarama.com/pakistani-prime-minister-imran-khan-slammed-for-blaming-very-short-clothes-on-increase-in-sexual-violence/#respond Mon, 21 Jun 2021 13:36:25 +0000 https://western-rollarama.com/pakistani-prime-minister-imran-khan-slammed-for-blaming-very-short-clothes-on-increase-in-sexual-violence/ Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan has faced a torrent of criticism after blaming an increase in sexual violence against women wearing “very little clothes” because men are not “robots”. In his interview with Jonathan Swan of Axios HBOMr Khan said: “If a woman wears very little clothing, it will have an impact on men, unless […]]]>


Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan has faced a torrent of criticism after blaming an increase in sexual violence against women wearing “very little clothes” because men are not “robots”.

In his interview with Jonathan Swan of Axios HBOMr Khan said: “If a woman wears very little clothing, it will have an impact on men, unless they are robots. It’s just common sense. ”

Mr Khan went on to suggest that it depends on what is acceptable in the culture a person lives in. He said that in a society where people haven’t “seen this kind of thing, it will have an impact on them.” If you grow up in a society like yours it might not have an impact, ”he said, referring to Western culture.

“This is cultural imperialism. Everything that is acceptable in our culture must be acceptable everywhere else. It is not,” he added.

Earlier this year, in April, the Pakistani prime minister defended the traditional Islamic practice of women wearing the veil during a live question-and-answer show on Geo TV.

He then said, “If you keep increasing vulgarity in a society, then there will definitely be that impact.” The practice of wearing the veil existed, he said, so that “there is no temptation in society”.

Mr Khan attempted to justify these earlier remarks in the Axios interview. “We don’t have nightclubs, we don’t have nightclubs, so it’s a different way of life here,” he said. “If you increase the temptation in society to a certain point and all these young people have nowhere to go, it has consequences in society.”

The prime minister of the predominantly Muslim nation drew a strong reaction for his comments on social media.

“Disappointing and frankly disgusting to see Prime Minister Imran Khan repeat his victim’s blame for the reasons for sexual violence in Pakistan. Men are not “robots,” he says. If they see women in light clothes they will be “tempted” and some will resort to rape, “Reema Omer, a human rights professional from Lahore, said in a tweet.

“Just three days after the rape of a child by a cleric, Imran Khan chooses to blame ‘little clothing’ worn by women for the culture of rape. This is not a slip of the tongue. Such blame on victims has been a constant position of IK since the highway incident last year. Our prime minister is an apologist for rape, ”said another.

In the interview, Khan also touched on a wide range of other issues, including the US withdrawal from Afghanistan, the Kashmir dispute and the treatment of Uyghur Muslims. He sparked new controversy when he said he would not allow the United States to use Pakistan as a base for cross-border terrorist operations.

And in response to questions about why he has not publicly condemned the allegations of human rights violations against ethnic Uyghurs in China, he said, “Whatever problems we have with the Chinese, we have them. let’s talk in camera. China has been one of our best friends in our most difficult times. “

He also asked why the world was obsessed with Xinjiang while ignoring what he said India was doing in Kashmir.



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Letters and comments: June 20, 2021 https://western-rollarama.com/letters-and-comments-june-20-2021/ https://western-rollarama.com/letters-and-comments-june-20-2021/#respond Sun, 20 Jun 2021 08:00:30 +0000 https://western-rollarama.com/letters-and-comments-june-20-2021/ The ultra-rich not taxed on the growth of their wealth If there has ever been an example of utter naivety, Fred Shay’s recent letter on taxes paid by ultra-rich American taxpayers does the trick. Obviously, he missed the recent three-page USA Today article that shed light on the facts about how people like Jeff Bezos, […]]]>


The ultra-rich not taxed on the growth of their wealth

If there has ever been an example of utter naivety, Fred Shay’s recent letter on taxes paid by ultra-rich American taxpayers does the trick.

Obviously, he missed the recent three-page USA Today article that shed light on the facts about how people like Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Elon Musk, etc. have paid little or no income taxes in the past 15 years. The key word is “income”. Most of these people receive little or no income. They have found loopholes in the tax codes that allow them to do things like use their investments as collateral to borrow money and amortize the interest on those loans. What they should be forced to pay are taxes on the growth of their wealth, some countries already have such a system.

Imagine for a second … if the rich paid taxes on the growth of their wealth, there would be no national debt and less taxes for those of us who pay proportionately more than our fair share.

Cynthia K. Williams, Titusville

Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos, who is the richest person in the world, paid no income tax in 2007 and 2011, according to a report from Propublica.

Tap water with fluoride for me please

I want to thank the anonymous donor who sent me the box of purified water; however, I prefer tap water with fluoride.

I used to buy bottled water for convenience; then with the drought, I realized that the big companies were exploiting our water supply systems for profit and also contaminating our oceans with plastic bottles.



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Meet Compton Cowboy Riding To Honor Black Cowboys And Juneteenth https://western-rollarama.com/meet-compton-cowboy-riding-to-honor-black-cowboys-and-juneteenth/ https://western-rollarama.com/meet-compton-cowboy-riding-to-honor-black-cowboys-and-juneteenth/#respond Sat, 19 Jun 2021 11:54:30 +0000 https://western-rollarama.com/meet-compton-cowboy-riding-to-honor-black-cowboys-and-juneteenth/ Hosley took a Greyhound bus to Texas. He turned pro at 19. In 2013, he was the Bill Pickett Rodeo Rookie of the Year. He won a bareback riding title and is a five-time California Tour Champion of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association. All the while he said he enjoyed the trip so much – […]]]>


Hosley took a Greyhound bus to Texas. He turned pro at 19. In 2013, he was the Bill Pickett Rodeo Rookie of the Year. He won a bareback riding title and is a five-time California Tour Champion of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association.

All the while he said he enjoyed the trip so much – the broken hand and other injuries, the weeks without control, the disappointing efforts, the growth as a man, the fatherhood, the victories, the camaraderie, exposure – that race the dynamics of the sport has not been an obstacle. But he is aware of the emptiness of diversity.

“You don’t have a lot of black people interested in rodeos other than Bill Pickett,” he said. This is why the event broadcast on Juneteenth “is so big,” he said.

Denard Butler, one of the pro tour’s most respected cowboys, is a black steer wrestler from Atlanta who made a name for himself in the profession.

“It’s rare that I see people who look like me on the tour,” said Hosley. “When I do, it’s cool to see, especially when I see someone like Denard. He looks good, wins and represents himself well. They must respect it.

Butler said early in his career that he had endured racism constantly on the rodeo circuit and had fought in several bars to defend his honor along the way. “But nothing would scare me away, I love it so much. This is the life I chose, despite all that. Everything I ever wanted to do,” he said.

Black cowboys are steeped in cowboy history in America, and this will be highlighted on the Juneteenth show. Authors Phillip Durham and Everett L. Jones wrote in the 1965 book “The Negro Cowboys” that as many as 8,000 black men were cowboys in the 1800s. Bill Pickett, who invented “bulldogging,” a technique used in rodeos to wrestle and trap an ox, Nate Love, a sniper who has inspired many movie characters, and Ned Huddleston, a former rodeo clown turned outlaw, have been among the first and most famous black cowboys. At the time, after the Civil War, an estimated one in four cowboys was black, according to Smithsonian Magazine.

Recently, awareness of the black cowboy has gained momentum in black culture. Actor Idris Elba starred in the popular Netflix movie “Concrete Cowboy” about the Black Riders of downtown Philadelphia. Artists Solonge and Lil Nas X introduced the American Western style to their work.

Hosley, 6ft, 180lb, said he enjoyed the cowboy life – tending the horses, competing, the peace of life on the farm – and that his biggest worry had been to sort out his schedule, which he learned from Melissa Hijdik, the mother of a classmate he met at school bareback.

Upon graduation from school, Hosley was offered a rodeo scholarship to Wharton Junior College outside of Houston. But he had nowhere to live and couldn’t afford a hotel.

Hijdik offered his house.

“I got to know Tre and his story touched me,” she said. “He wanted it so badly. And his talent was incredible. I had the space and wanted to help. My friends thought I was crazy doing it. “You don’t know him,” they said. We had to work on some things. But we did. In the end, all I did was give her a place to live. He did the rest.

Hosley called Hijdik “my mom from Texas”.

“I didn’t go into the rodeo to try and make friends,” he says, “but I still made some really good ones. She and her family are like family.



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Rizal in “bahag”: repression against racial repression https://western-rollarama.com/rizal-in-bahag-repression-against-racial-repression/ https://western-rollarama.com/rizal-in-bahag-repression-against-racial-repression/#respond Fri, 18 Jun 2021 21:32:00 +0000 https://western-rollarama.com/rizal-in-bahag-repression-against-racial-repression/ ‘INDIGENIUS’ Kidlat Tahimik, national artist from Baguio City, holds a wooden sculpture of José Rizal wearing an overcoat and loincloth, a representation of the “native genius” of the national hero at the heart of his Western upbringing. Today marks Rizal’s 160th birthday. —VINCENT CABREZA BAGUIO CITY – A miniature wooden statue of José Rizal in […]]]>


‘INDIGENIUS’ Kidlat Tahimik, national artist from Baguio City, holds a wooden sculpture of José Rizal wearing an overcoat and loincloth, a representation of the “native genius” of the national hero at the heart of his Western upbringing. Today marks Rizal’s 160th birthday. —VINCENT CABREZA

BAGUIO CITY – A miniature wooden statue of José Rizal in a cloak and “bahag” (loincloth) was the star of an impromptu art installation that Kidlat Tahimik, a national film artist, mounted on June 12.

It was Tahimik’s way of echoing today’s generation of the national hero’s strong disapproval of the way Filipinos were portrayed – or racially caricatured – at an international event. organized in its time.

Rizal then denounced the 1887 Philippine Exposition in Madrid for exhibiting Filipinos as in “a human zoo,” Tahimik, 78, said. So the acclaimed visual artist decided that a redesigned Rizal in native attire, especially that of the Cordillera people, was a fitting subject to mark Independence Day.

Basic nature

Tahimik (or Eric de Guia) wanted to keep the piece on display at Sunshine Park in Baguio until today, the 160th anniversary of Rizal’s birth, but it had to be dismantled and shipped to Spain on June 16 for another exhibition. .

The woodcarving is part of the larger installation where it occupies a stage in the shape of a “salakot” (native hat). It was last seen by the public at a location near the Baguio convention center, where city officials hosted the recent Independence Day program.

Entitled “MadExpo 1887”, the Rizal woodcarving depicts the national hero wearing a European-style cloak and a bahag, with a book in his hand.

“What did we hear about Rizal? Wow, he wrote his novels in Spanish because he was fluent in the colonizer’s language. Wow, he introduced a water system using western engineering. Wow, he operated on his mother’s eyes because he learned Western medicine, ”Tahimik said, recounting the thoughts that shaped his creation. “What message does that say? That we have to be westernized to make progress. But I firmly believe that underneath Rizal’s European dress is that thong, which is his fundamental Filipino nature that made him excel, not western culture, ”he added.

‘wild’

The exhibit prompted Rizal to write a letter telling his friend, German scholar Ferdinand Blumentritt, “Don’t mind the Filipino exhibit in Madrid. According to the newspapers and the information I have, it will not be a Filipino exhibition but an exhibition of Igorots, who will play their musical instruments, cook, sing and dance.

“But I pity these poor people,” Rizal wrote again. “They will be exhibited at the Zoological Garden of Madrid and with their simple and original clothes, they will contract a terrible pneumonia. This disease is very common in Madrid and even the people of Madrid catch it despite their coverage.

Archives describe the 1887 Madrid Expo as an event intended to foster trade ties between Spain and its distant Asian colony.

But, as Tahimik saw, the exhibit also showed the indigenous people of the Philippines and their artifacts to suggest that they were inferior to the educated Filipinos in the West. INQ

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New mural depicting water use in the West https://western-rollarama.com/new-mural-depicting-water-use-in-the-west/ https://western-rollarama.com/new-mural-depicting-water-use-in-the-west/#respond Fri, 18 Jun 2021 00:16:55 +0000 https://western-rollarama.com/new-mural-depicting-water-use-in-the-west/ Posted: June 17, 2021 / 6:16 PM MDT / Update: June 17, 2021 / 6:16 PM MDT Pupils at Fruita Middle School are working with the Fruita City Arts and Culture Council for a seven-day summer initiative consisting of a rafting trip and an intensive arts-to-education project. The Wellspring project is dedicated to managing water […]]]>


Posted:
Update:

Pupils at Fruita Middle School are working with the Fruita City Arts and Culture Council for a seven-day summer initiative consisting of a rafting trip and an intensive arts-to-education project.

The Wellspring project is dedicated to managing water use in the West. A local sculptor and muralist works with students to create two 75-foot murals along the waterfront trail. “They work with me on these two large murals, and then they work with a lot of local artists to create some great projects around water. It has been so much fun working with them, I am so excited, ”said Pavia Justinian.

A student from Fruita Middle School shared her thoughts on the mural. “I’m really proud of myself, it’s really special to know that it’s going to be there for a while and people will see it,” said Madison Rehburg.

After the seven-day Wellspring Project, Fruita Middle School students participated in events that gave them a taste of water conservation. The mural will represent the hard work of students throughout the well spring project while engaging the public in learning the importance of water use.



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“I try to show humanity and beauty”: Michael Mohammed Ahmad on rewriting Arab masculinity | Books https://western-rollarama.com/i-try-to-show-humanity-and-beauty-michael-mohammed-ahmad-on-rewriting-arab-masculinity-books/ https://western-rollarama.com/i-try-to-show-humanity-and-beauty-michael-mohammed-ahmad-on-rewriting-arab-masculinity-books/#respond Wed, 16 Jun 2021 23:45:00 +0000 https://western-rollarama.com/i-try-to-show-humanity-and-beauty-michael-mohammed-ahmad-on-rewriting-arab-masculinity-books/ Michael Mohammed Ahmad will not apologize for his reality, even if talking about it sincerely makes people uncomfortable. It was about “confronting things,” he says, the cameras and barbed wire fences that were a permanent part of his upbringing at Punchbowl Boys High School; to have grown up as a Muslim at the time of […]]]>


Michael Mohammed Ahmad will not apologize for his reality, even if talking about it sincerely makes people uncomfortable. It was about “confronting things,” he says, the cameras and barbed wire fences that were a permanent part of his upbringing at Punchbowl Boys High School; to have grown up as a Muslim at the time of the gang rapes in Skaf, September 11, the riots in Cronulla; to see classmates being stabbed.

His premier of New South Wales award-winning novel The Lebs, which was also shortlisted for the Miles Franklin, drew on so many of these experiences. But it was his frustrations with the late cartoonist Bill Leak’s cartoons about the authorship of “colored men” – portrayals which Ahmad said are racist and deeply offensive – that underpinned his desire to write more Arab and Muslim masculinity. tender and loving in her new novel. , The other half of you.

“I have the impression that the Arab fathers and the Muslim fathers, and more broadly, the indigenous fathers and the colored fathers – are always dehumanized, constructed [as not loving] our children just like white men love their children, ”says Ahmad.

He believes such depictions are part of a “strong fusion in Western culture between patriarchy and masculinity”, in which Arab men who have masculine features – Ahmad describes them as “tall, dark, hairy and extroverts” with loud voices – are immediately considered patriarchal.

“Most men of color cannot escape masculinity,” he says, saying the way men of color present themselves and speak often matches male cues and stereotypes. “[Academic and activist] Bell Hooks argues that we must be able to honor and revere what is masculine and beautiful, separate from patriarchy.

Ahmad’s latest self-fiction novel – the third installment in the life of main character Bani Adam, following on from The Lebs and Ahmad’s debut novel The Tribe – explores a young Muslim’s complex negotiation between faith, family and romance tradition. In it, a young, naive and zealous love between a Christian girl and a Muslim boy is prematurely ended by the restless tongues of the Bani community and his father’s accusation that he had “shamed the house of Adam”.

Ahmad balances his protagonist’s quest for the kind of love he had studied in the great classics of literature with his respect and reverence for his father, safeguarding his heritage and identity. “I feared my father… not as I feared barking dogs and child molesters, but as I feared the sun, which gave me life, and might as well cremate me,” Bani mused to one. given moment, of a masculinity that manifests itself both symbolically and physically in his life.

The other half of you is written with the honesty and courage that characterizes Ahmad, but the affection for his characters, despite their very clear flaws, is evident.

“My job as a writer is not to tell a positive story, my job is to tell an honest and complex story,” he says. “On the one hand, I feel a strong responsibility to take care of my community, to represent its diversity, to show its strengths. But I don’t shy away from their weaknesses and flaws, because there are flaws. And there are things in our community that we need to improve.

He lists bad fathers in the book, which includes multiple perpetrators of domestic, physical and emotional violence.

Photography: Hachette Australia

He is adamant that it is not his role to speak on behalf of Arab-Australian women. But, he says, “I want to speak honestly about problem fathers. I don’t want to romanticize them, but what I’m trying to do is counterbalance that, show their humanity… show times when they show the ability to grow, to change.

Bani’s father is one of those characters. Ahmad wanted to explore his ability to love his children, and to choose them over and over again, despite “the horrible world he came from and what he had to overcome.”

Ahmad speaks fondly of his own father, a once illiterate man who now visits Ahmad’s house in western Sydney once a week to teach Ahmad’s “half-breed” son Kahlil to read and write. Arab.

“They are having so much fun together,” he says. “They laugh a lot during the lesson, and seeing this transformation, and seeing how beautiful my son’s world is because of my father’s transformation, and mine, is beautiful.”

Ahmad thinks it’s no coincidence that there has been such a negative narrative around the Arab people, citing scholar Edward Said’s argument that the reason academic literature courses omit the Arab canon , despite its thousands of years, is that it humanizes them.

“Said argued that if you are going to invade and take these people’s land and wipe them out, you cannot show humanizing details about them. And because the Arab canon is so poetic, so romantic, so chivalrous, you might feel compassion for these people, ”he says.

“We don’t really have a terrorist story; we have a very romantic, very spiritual and loving story. And for me, in the spirit of what Edward Said was saying, this book tries to convey that image in the hope that it influences the way Australians see us.

Ahmad sees literacy and education as essential to breaking cycles of patriarchy and violence, and founded Sweatshop: Western Sydney Literacy Movement to empower young people of diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds through reading, writing and critical thinking, and mentor them to write their own stories.

“I wrote this book to create a humanizing and beautiful portrait of the love and connection of an Arab and Muslim father and son,” he says. “And I don’t want this to be just a representation of my love for my son, but a representation of our love, the love of men of color for their sons and daughters, and also the love and respect we feel for the women in our lives who bring our children into the world.

The Other Half of You by Michael Mohammed Ahmad is now available at Hachette



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Western News – Mind before matter https://western-rollarama.com/western-news-mind-before-matter/ https://western-rollarama.com/western-news-mind-before-matter/#respond Wed, 16 Jun 2021 00:29:43 +0000 https://western-rollarama.com/western-news-mind-before-matter/ Keith Chow has long believed that focusing on the highlights of each day is essential to surviving the tough times. In 2017, while in his sophomore year at Western University, he started a Daily Appreciation Instagram blog to feature one photo per day of something that made him happy. It was a way to stay […]]]>


Keith Chow has long believed that focusing on the highlights of each day is essential to surviving the tough times. In 2017, while in his sophomore year at Western University, he started a Daily Appreciation Instagram blog to feature one photo per day of something that made him happy. It was a way to stay in touch with family and friends, spread positivity, and build community.

“The idea was that there would be things that get you down every day, but if you pay more attention and enjoy the great little moments that happen in your life, you learn that the hard times aren’t that bad. after all. It was really important because, sometimes, course management, university training and a social life naturally presented challenges, “he said.” A lot of positive things have come out of this. [the Instagram blog]. I built a small community around it and even inspired other people to start their own daily appreciation journey.

This strategy then helped him get through one of the most difficult experiences of his life. On March 2, 2018, while Chow was in his first year of Ivey’s HBA program, he suffered a severe concussion over several years that left him wondering if he would ever be able to fully function again. .

At first, Chow tried to cross it. He finished his classes for the year and started a summer internship role. But soon his health deteriorated. He had difficulty with basic brain functions such as remembering things, expressing thoughts correctly, and thinking without pain. Chow cut his internship short and decided not to go back to school in the fall.

Keith chow

“I quit school for a year because I didn’t know how to deal with my concussion. I didn’t realize how bad the situation was until I couldn’t even get up to get myself ready to eat. I realized that I couldn’t do it all on my own, ”he said.

Build resilience

Chow returned home to Vancouver, British Columbia, saw a specialist and began working with an occupational therapist to resume his duties. It was a difficult time. Once a top athlete, having competed with Team Canada Ultimate and captain of the Western Mustangs Ultimate Frisbee, Chow struggled to slow down. Part of his recovery plan was to limit himself to just 30 minutes of daily activity, whether it was socializing, exercising, or tasks requiring mental focus. He spent the remaining hours of the day meditating and trying to keep his mind blank. He tried to get five extra minutes of activity every week. He knew that if he pushed himself too hard, he would be off duty for days.

“Holding back is the hardest part. You just want to be better and prove to yourself that you can do more. I was a driving person before. I played sports at a very high level. At Ivey my social life and my work have always been at a very high level, ”he said. “The real test of resilience for me was being able to say that I understand what my limits are and that I will take a step back and rest. “

As a sociable person, he struggled to limit his social interactions. From the age of 10, Chow would ride a bus to downtown Vancouver and start conversations with random passers-by for fun, from homeless people to professionals. As captain of the Ultimate Frisbee varsity team, he used his people skills to foster a team culture of success. He was always curious about how different people operate and interact.

“I definitely had a little identity crisis because in social situations I was used to being the bubbly person – the person who connects people. I was good at meeting people and building relationships,” he said. “Then, with my limitations in thought, speech and energy from my concussion, I had this strange period of social adjustment.”

Focusing on the positive – every little step of progress – has helped him persevere in the face of adversity.

Keith chow [right] was captain of the Western Mustangs Ultimate Frisbee Team.

Highlights

Chow returned to Ivey in September 2019 and eventually completed his HBA by organizing a limited workload. Basically, one year of programming spanned two years. There were certainly difficult times. One of them was when it took him eight hours to complete an exam because he had to take a break every 30 minutes to clear his head before returning for another round of assignments. Taking the exam was a memorable one for him. Chow took a photo from the bench and shared it as a message of appreciation for the day. He was capturing the bright side of the experience again – he had survived a grueling eight-hour workday, which he had been working on for the past two years.

“Getting the extra time was great, but it’s getting harder and harder to work every hour longer. Every time I sat down to write I completely used up all of my concentration energy, so I tried to muster as much energy as I could on this bench, ”he said. “At the end of the day, I don’t care how the exam actually went. I wanted this to be an important step in my recovery and proof that I was going in the right direction. I finally had the validation that the recovery work was paying off.

By understanding his limitations and restraining himself, Chow grew to 10 hours of activity per day. He even just finished a marathon. After completing his HBA in December 2020, he started working. This feat seemed unlikely a few years ago. Chow first worked as a business development manager at WandrPass, a startup that provides marketing solutions and business analytics to restaurants to help them cope with the pandemic. He recently joined TouchBistro, a software company that offers restaurant management systems, as a Market Development Representative.

Chow said the new role made her feel like she had come full circle. Working in sales forces him to build relationships with people, just as he did when he was a kid on the streets of Vancouver.

But he’s not the type to attribute that to fate. The hard-won victory came from his change of mind.

“Contrary to popular belief, I don’t think everything happens for a reason. I think life is just happening and it’s your ability to let go of your past reality and make the most of your new reality that determines your happiness in the future, ”he said. “I had to be okay with not improving at some point. I have learned through this recovery process not to think about the future, but rather how I can make the most of what I have right now.



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Stan Grant valiantly tries to resolve cultural and political divide in China tonight https://western-rollarama.com/stan-grant-valiantly-tries-to-resolve-cultural-and-political-divide-in-china-tonight/ https://western-rollarama.com/stan-grant-valiantly-tries-to-resolve-cultural-and-political-divide-in-china-tonight/#respond Tue, 15 Jun 2021 02:35:38 +0000 https://western-rollarama.com/stan-grant-valiantly-tries-to-resolve-cultural-and-political-divide-in-china-tonight/ Loading The first two (of six) episodes include explanations of changes in family planning in China, from the one-child policy of the 1980s to the three-child policy of today, and Hong’s passage. Kong from British control to control of the Chinese Communist Party. These sections are primarily educational features. To more invested viewers, they will […]]]>


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The first two (of six) episodes include explanations of changes in family planning in China, from the one-child policy of the 1980s to the three-child policy of today, and Hong’s passage. Kong from British control to control of the Chinese Communist Party.

These sections are primarily educational features. To more invested viewers, they will seem too general, but Chinese history lessons have been largely limited to elective units in high schools, and only around 130 Australians of non-Chinese descent can speak Chinese fluently. The more background, the better.

The show is at its best when it delves three times deeper into the Chinese comedy scene, the feminist movement, and video game culture. They all offer new perspectives on emerging trends in China. Comedian Annie Louey examines the nuances of why Western jokes fall flat in Chinese comedy, journalist Angharad Yeo explores China’s video game curfew to stop late night teenage girls from fueling the 32 billion industry dollars, and Samuel Yang examines the challenges facing young feminist organizers across China.

But they also reveal the limits of managing an outside show. In both episodes, a single voice from mainland China based in China is featured, Maizi Li, a feminist activist whose personal social media accounts have been closed.

Otherwise, it’s filled with Australian academics, Chinese experts living abroad, or foreign officials like Wang. This is a problem that all media have to face now that there are no longer Australian journalists working for Australian media in China and the general public is increasingly afraid to speak to foreign media, but it is worth recognizing.

The meat of the show for the closest observers of China is found in Grant’s interviews with his guests. It takes an adversarial, ABC 7.30style approach, playing devil’s advocate with Hui (the exiled Hong Kong politician) to ask why Hong Kong should have freedoms other parts of China don’t, while pressuring Wang on the allegations of genocide in Xinjiang.

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Wang, a charmer who did not come from Beijing’s “wolf warrior” diplomatic school, is scholar and socialite. He cut his teeth in Washington and Brussels. He’s comfortable in panels and speeches, but less so in this Australian style of TV interview. If Grant can replicate it with heavier hitters from Beijing or Hong Kong, that will make a good TV.

Structurally, the show is interesting. It goes to larger, lighter areas that would traditionally have ended topical programs before shrinking. It opens with “What trend? From presenter Yvonne Yong. column on Chinese social networks. Race Through Popular Topics on Weibo: The Elephant Herd Marching Through China, The TV Show’s Next Cult Friends, and the endless pressure of college entrance exams.

There is a risk that this approach will shed light on the “crazy stuff that happened in China this week” to grab viewers’ attention, but it can (for now) be a practical way to get people in. on a dense subject.

The show’s greatest strength lies in the diversity of its reporters. Grant and his producers gave young Chinese-Australian journalists and presenters a chance, endowing the show with a new group of journalists who could be essential for Australia to understand China in the years to come.

Eryk Bagshaw is the North Asia correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.

China tonight is Tuesday, ABC News, 8 p.m. and ABC, 10:30 p.m.



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Chris Paul and Phoenix Suns sweep Denver Nuggets to advance to Western Conference Finals https://western-rollarama.com/chris-paul-and-phoenix-suns-sweep-denver-nuggets-to-advance-to-western-conference-finals/ https://western-rollarama.com/chris-paul-and-phoenix-suns-sweep-denver-nuggets-to-advance-to-western-conference-finals/#respond Mon, 14 Jun 2021 05:09:50 +0000 https://western-rollarama.com/chris-paul-and-phoenix-suns-sweep-denver-nuggets-to-advance-to-western-conference-finals/ Goodbye, Denver Nuggets. Hello Western Conference finals. The Phoenix Suns completed a conference semifinals sweep with a 125-118 win in Game 4 over the Nuggets in front of 18,290 fans at Ball Arena. Chris Paul took over again scoring a high of 37 points as the Suns led the second-seeded Suns in the Western Conference […]]]>


Goodbye, Denver Nuggets.

Hello Western Conference finals.

The Phoenix Suns completed a conference semifinals sweep with a 125-118 win in Game 4 over the Nuggets in front of 18,290 fans at Ball Arena.

Chris Paul took over again scoring a high of 37 points as the Suns led the second-seeded Suns in the Western Conference Finals for the first time since 2010, which was the last time they made the playoffs. .

“He did what Chris Paul does,” said Suns forward Jae Crowder. “Point guard, ‘Point God’, whatever you want to call him, he controlled the game the whole game.”

Devin Booker scored 34 points as the second-seeded Suns set a franchise record for most consecutive playoff wins at seven.

Mikal Bridges added 14 while Deandre Ayton added 12.

“It’s a hard feeling to express,” Booker said. “You always think after a game like this or you wrap up a series, you sit down and think a bit and think about what we’ve been through as an organization and as a team. Even in the short span of time (Suns coach) Monty (Williams) has been here, just watching the culture develop and watching the players improve every day and people put their helmets on and come to work every day. It’s a beautiful sight. to see the hard work pay off. “

June 13, 2021;  Denver, Colorado, United States;  Phoenix Suns goalie Devin Booker (1) reacts after a third quarter game against the Denver Nuggets in Game 4 of the 2021 NBA Playoff Second Round at Ball Arena.  Mandatory Credit: Isaiah J. Downing-USA TODAY Sports

At the heart of the Phoenix’s first series sweep since 2010 is the 36-year-old point guard who came to the Oklahoma City Suns via pre-season trade and was instrumental in the team’s complete turnaround after a season of 19 wins in 2018-19.

Paul.

The 16-year-old veteran scored 12 of his game-high 37 points in the third quarter on a perfect 6 of 6 shot to keep the Nuggets at bay. Making nine consecutive shots at one point, Paul scored 25 points in the second half on 10 of 12 shots.





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Sonoma County spots included in new book celebrating the beauty and soul of Western Gardens https://western-rollarama.com/sonoma-county-spots-included-in-new-book-celebrating-the-beauty-and-soul-of-western-gardens/ https://western-rollarama.com/sonoma-county-spots-included-in-new-book-celebrating-the-beauty-and-soul-of-western-gardens/#respond Fri, 11 Jun 2021 21:09:44 +0000 https://western-rollarama.com/sonoma-county-spots-included-in-new-book-celebrating-the-beauty-and-soul-of-western-gardens/ For too long, the lush, leafy gardens of England and the East Coast have set the standard for gardens everywhere. Gardeners in dry climates have struggled to recreate the ideal with lawns and water-thirsty flowers and shrubs. But the Western Garden has a different soul and is no less beautiful, say Caitlin Atkinson and Jennifer […]]]>


For too long, the lush, leafy gardens of England and the East Coast have set the standard for gardens everywhere. Gardeners in dry climates have struggled to recreate the ideal with lawns and water-thirsty flowers and shrubs.

But the Western Garden has a different soul and is no less beautiful, say Caitlin Atkinson and Jennifer Jewell. The two women have collaborated on a new book celebrating the little-known virtues of gardens that embrace rather than erase the rugged landscape of the American West.

“Under Western Skies: Visionary Gardens from the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Coast” (Timber Press, May 2021), presents 36 gardens that embody the spirit of the West, with its great diversity of plants and geography. Two of the gardens are in Sonoma County.

“The gardening media over the past 100 years has promulgated this vision of a beautiful garden that looks like it was straight out of England,” said Jewell, who lives in Chico and hosts the award-winning weekly public radio show and the podcast “Place of culture: conversations about natural history and the human impulse in the garden.”

“There have been a few exceptions from iconic Southwestern gardens, but overall the idea of ​​what is beautiful is very limited and based on a garden that uses a lot more resources than most Americans during of a season, especially in the West, “she said.

Jewell, whose mission is to elevate ‘the way we think and talk about gardening’ and explore ‘the intersection of places, cultures and gardens’, joins Atkinson, a garden photographer equally passionate about working with the landscape as against it.

“Every region and every garden has such different flavors,” Jewell said. “But most of the whole of the west has a fairly long dry season, while parts of the southwest experience a late summer monsoon and the northwest receives rain until late summer. summer. There is less water throughout the year in most western countries. I love the way people work with the sometimes difficult environmental conditions in their areas – floods, fires, drought. “

Much more than a breakdown of proper plants and design techniques paired with pretty pictures, “Under Western Skies” shows how each garden reflects a sense of place and the sensitivity of the gardener who created it. Jewell and Atkinson have highlighted gardeners who not only have beautiful scenery, but who do the hard work of digging in the dirt.

“I think it’s important because the more time you spend in the garden, with your plants, with your soil, with the environment, the more connected you are to it,” Jewell said. “I have the impression that when you walk into a garden, it’s someone’s personal project. You can feel the soul of the garden, as all the love and energy that went into this garden is part of what makes it beautiful.

Pig hill paradise

One of those gardens that shows this deep connection between garden and gardener is Hog Hill, a sprawling hilltop garden in Sevastopol that is a true horticultural partnership between Mary and Lew Reid. She is a landscape designer and artist who takes an artistic approach to garden design. He is a plant collector and propagator who propagated more than half of the 6,000 plants that entered the original plantation. On their first dates, they showed up at their favorite nurseries. For Lew, it was the Half Moon Bay nursery. For Mary, it was the famous Western Hills nursery in the West.

“I love Mary’s pictorial combination of colors and textures,” Atkinson said. “And I love their mix of native and climate-adapted plants.”

While Hog Hill has many Californian natives, the garden is not made up entirely of native plants. It was also not designed strictly for drought tolerance.

But because most of the plants come from Mediterranean climates, the garden is suitable for our dry summer climate. And the couple have learned over time and through trial and error which plants are happiest in their microclimate, which they describe as a bit of a banana belt in western Sonoma County. They removed everything that was found to be intrusive, including Stipa tenuissima, even though they loved him.

Although they have made changes over the years, Mary has retained the original “color foundation” that is an integral part of the 3-acre garden.

Native Plant Pioneer Garden

“Under Western Skies” also visits the Sebastopol Garden of Phil Van Soelen, who for years ran “California Flora Nursery”, one of California’s first native plant nurseries in the Bay Area. Founded in 1981, it is still in business under different owners.

Van Soelen’s own garden, which he shares with his wife Mary Killian, reflects his love and commitment to the botany of the Golden State.



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